Roundtable | Memory, Activism and Social Justice TFDC 1.17
Jul 06, 2023 09:00 - 10:30(Europe/London)
20230706T0900 20230706T1030 Europe/London 5.23. The ethics of community-led practices of remembrance: a roundtable on methodologies of participatory memory work

This roundtable explores methodologies for an ethical collaboration of academia and marginalized / disenfranchised communities. Collaborative research projects can work as acts of remembrance by renegotiating the border between memorable and unmemorable lives (Rigney 2021), and they are interventions into our audiovisual memory (Brunow 2015). This roundtable brings together memory scholars and practitioners. It offers opportunities for memory scholars to reflect on their role and responsibilities as academics and will give hands on advice for scholars. Bringing the Newcastle based film and photography collective Amber into dialogue with academic methodologies, this roundtable will discuss the possibilities and pitfalls of collaborations between memory scholars and communities, setting out not only to enable cross generational dialogues, but also to bridge the gap between academia and society. Input 1 Amber: A role model pertaining high ethical standards around the collaboration with communities, Amber has been active for five decades. Amber's role in creating a working class audiovisual memory in the Northeast can hardly be underestimated. Especially Amber's recent educational work is a memory work which allows for a cross generational dialogue in the Northeast. With some of the collective's members present at the panel (Hare et al), we shall discuss the ethics of community collaboration when documenting changing communities. Input 2: Caroline Mitchell' input presents community media approaches to oral history interviewing. It draws on two participatory action research projects in northeast England: "Putting Southwick on the Map" (2015 16) and "Whitburn Resonance" (2021 2) involving local coastal communities and their previously undervalued and unrecorded memories an ...

TFDC 1.17 MSA Conference Newcastle 2023 conference@memorystudiesassociation.org
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This roundtable explores methodologies for an ethical collaboration of academia and marginalized / disenfranchised communities. Collaborative research projects can work as acts of remembrance by renegotiating the border between memorable and unmemorable lives (Rigney 2021), and they are interventions into our audiovisual memory (Brunow 2015). This roundtable brings together memory scholars and practitioners. It offers opportunities for memory scholars to reflect on their role and responsibilities as academics and will give hands on advice for scholars. Bringing the Newcastle based film and photography collective Amber into dialogue with academic methodologies, this roundtable will discuss the possibilities and pitfalls of collaborations between memory scholars and communities, setting out not only to enable cross generational dialogues, but also to bridge the gap between academia and society. Input 1 Amber: A role model pertaining high ethical standards around the collaboration with communities, Amber has been active for five decades. Amber's role in creating a working class audiovisual memory in the Northeast can hardly be underestimated. Especially Amber's recent educational work is a memory work which allows for a cross generational dialogue in the Northeast. With some of the collective's members present at the panel (Hare et al), we shall discuss the ethics of community collaboration when documenting changing communities. Input 2: Caroline Mitchell' input presents community media approaches to oral history interviewing. It draws on two participatory action research projects in northeast England: "Putting Southwick on the Map" (2015 16) and "Whitburn Resonance" (2021 2) involving local coastal communities and their previously undervalued and unrecorded memories and stories. Mitchell will outline key aspects of the C MAP (Community Mapping, Arts and Participation) method (Mitchell and Winter, 2018) that foregrounds community media approaches to interviewing and a community oriented ethics framework for interviews as research. Interviewers are mindful of past hurts and the enduring nature of societal traumas (such as the closure of the shipyards in the 1980's). Embedding these interviews in geolocated maps, online sonic databases and community radio platforms has led to further engagement with communities and opportunities for community led and co produced based digital memory work. Input 3: Dagmar Brunow's input draws on her collaborative research project "The Lost Heritage?" involving the Swedish Archive for Queer Moving Images (Gothenburg) and bildwechsel (Hamburg), two archival projects which have developed an ethics of care to navigate queer visibility and vulnerability, working closely with communities, producers, and donors. Input 4: Sara Dybris McQuaid's input presents "accompanying research" as a contribution to elicitive approaches in peacebuilding. This input uses an ongoing attempt to bring "back to life" a heritage building in North Belfast, as a case to explore how complex temporalities have emerged in the Northern Ireland peace process (Dawson 2017, McQuaid 2022), and how these can be handled in projects of regeneration. The Northern Ireland Foundation is the platform working directly with the community, and so she will be reflecting on the role of becoming an "accompanying researcher" as a particular form of research practice cooperation that speaks to a collaborative ethics building.

Partner
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Amber Film and Photography Collective
Professor Radio and Participation
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University of Sunderland
Professor of film studies
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Linnaeus University
Associate Professor
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Aarhus University
Professor
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Utrecht University
Lecturer
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Fukuyama City University
 Maria Zirra
Postdoctoral Researcher
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Department of English, Stockholm University
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